Great Lakes Water Levels

February 21st, 2014 at 10:50 pm by under Bill's Blog, News, Weather

Macinac Bridge winter     The water level of Lake Michigan/Huron is unchanged over the last month.  The level is 14″ higher than it was one year ago and 12″ below the century average.  Lake Superior is down 2″ in the last month, but up 11″ since Feb. 2013.  Superior is just one inch below the long-term average.  Lake Erie and Lake Ontario were both down 4″ in the last month.  Both lakes are 2″ higher than one year ago.  Lake Erie is 3″ below the long-term average and Lake Ontario is one inch below the century average.   The potential for spring flooding is higher than usual this year.  We have an extensive above average snow cover across the entire Great Lakes.   The water equivalent in the snowcover was measured at 3.4″ in Lansing, 4.3″ in Muskegon and 5.8″ in Grand Rapids Friday afternoon.  Pic. of the Mackinac Bridge from upnorthlive.   Click on the pic. to enlarge.

Also:  “It’s a winter like no other.  We may not see another like this in my lifetime”…Ice caves on Lake Michigan….and On board the ice-cutter Mackinaw.

 

 

21 Responses to “Great Lakes Water Levels”

  1. Jeremy (Three Rivers) says:

    First!! And goodnight!

    1. Wswplz says:

      In the picture above, does anyone know what looks like a long cut out corridor in the middle of the ice is?

      1. DJ2450 (Central Gratiot) says:

        Not sure but that is the route that would be travaled if an ice cutter went through.

  2. Cort S. says:

    Check out this cool time lapse of a lenticular cloud:

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=465117533588388

    1. Jack says:

      Very COOL, Thanks CORT … :-)

  3. Ansel says:

    This is a winter “like no other”, at least since I’ve been alive. The snow has been on par with one of the more snowy winters in my lifetime, but the cold has been unique to say the least. For all the naysayers of global warming and climate change or whatever… the extremes seem to be amping up in both directions.

    1. Bill Steffen says:

      Ansel – I don’t think that’s the case. We’ve had more snow before (winter of 1951-52), more snow on the ground (1978), much colder temperatures. The last year was actually a relatively quiet year with a very low number of tornadoes and yet another year without a category 3 or higher hurricane hit on the U.S. The media amplifies weather events that received little national attention before TV and computers. Look at the extremes in 1936 or the number of strong tornadoes and hurricanes from the mid 1960s to 1970s. There’s a lot more in harms’s way now…120 years ago quite a few of the barrier islands in Florida were virtually uninhabited. Now we build to the level of high tide, so there’s a lot more damage. It’s the same with tornadoes. Twisters that moved over open farmland with little damage now hit sprawling suburbs.

      1. Wswplz says:

        I also wonder how many extreme events were never even recorded, I’m sure there were many. Large tornadoes for one sometimes weren’t reported because they would wipe out an entire town as if it were never there leaving no eye witness accounts of the event. Some of those events we have documented later however thanks to modern science, which is actually pretty cool.

      2. DJ 2450 (Central Gratiot) says:

        I’m not am experts on global warming and won’t pretend to be. However, I am old enough to recognize what the media has done (is doing) over the past half century to hype weather events. When I was young the weather reports were simple and pertained to reports from our own back yard. National weather events were rarely reported and International events would have had to be catastrophic to make the news at all.

        Today there’s TV shows dedicated to weather events. These shows dramatize and hype the weather event simply trying to get ratings. Look what happens every time a winter storm hits the East coast of the U.S. It’s usually the lead story on the National news and the headline on most online news sources. When I was young the weather forecast was provided once a day and the forecast was drawn by hand on a map of the U.S. At that time If the East coast were hit with 8″ of snow we didn’t even hear about it and if we did it wasn’t the major news of the day and was presented without video or hype.

        This blog is a good example of how fast news can travel today. In a matter of minutes we know about major accidents and road closures. A roof can’t collapse that’s not reported. If it’s snowing hard anywhere it’s reported here. In fact I think when the ballpark was on fire it was reported here first. The worst of the weather gets reported here fast. Even when the reports are not hyped you can sometimes think the sky is falling.

      3. DJ2450 (Central Gratiot) says:

        I’m not an expert on global warming and won’t pretend to be. However, I am old enough to recognize what the media has done (is doing) over the past half century to hype weather events. When I was young the weather reports were simple and pertained to reports from our own back yard. National weather events were rarely reported and International events would have had to be catastrophic to make the news at all.

        Today there’s TV shows dedicated to weather events. These shows dramatize and hype the weather event simply trying to get ratings. Look what happens every time a winter storm hits the East coast of the U.S. It’s usually the lead story on the National news and the headline on most online news sources. When I was young the weather forecast was provided once a day and the forecast was drawn by hand on a map of the U.S. At that time If the East coast were hit with 8″ of snow we didn’t even hear about it and if we did it wasn’t the major news of the day and was presented without video or hype.

        This blog is a good example of how fast news can travel today. In a matter of minutes we know about major accidents and road closures. A roof can’t collapse that’s not reported. If it’s snowing hard anywhere it’s reported here. In fact I think when the ballpark was on fire it was reported here first. The worst of the weather gets reported here fast. Even when the reports are not hyped you can sometimes think the sky is falling.

        1. Mark (East Lansing) says:

          Nicely said, DJ.

        2. Mark (East Lansing) says:

          Oh and for the record, I don’t give a crap about GW/CC or either side of the argument. It’s entertaining to watch the two sides go at it because neither side will ever budge, kinda like Congress. Speaking of that, I’m not going to vote for any incumbents. I think its time for some new blood and fresh ideas. We’ve seen what the “old guard” can accomplish – nada.

        3. DJ2450 (Central Gratiot) says:

          Mark, for the record I have not taken sides either.

        4. yooper4021 says:

          +1 to both Mark and DJ. Well said.

  4. Jackie says:

    So what is the current snowfall total for Grand Rapids? Have we hit 2nd place yet on the all time list?

    1. Bill Steffen says:

      We need another 4.3″ to get to 2nd place (now at 102.9″ in G.R.). It’s a certainty that we’ll get that 4.3″.

  5. Jack says:

    HEY BILL, Did my Taxes Today. You ever seen this Parody of The Beatles Song TAXMAN ??? Done by OBAMA …..CHECK it Out , I Gave Me a LAUGH or Two. CUE::: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0M__0Z1pjg. Heeee, heeee…. Stay cued…. ;-)

  6. Mike M. says:

    Duluth sets record for most days registering below zero temps…

    http://www.crh.noaa.gov/news/display_cmsstory.php?wfo=dlh&storyid=100480&source=0

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