News

Earthquake in West Michigan

June 30th, 2015 at 12:08 pm by under Bill's Blog, News, Weather

earthquake 6 30  Click on the image to enlarge.  We’ve had another earthquake in Michigan this morning shortly before noon.  If you felt it, leave a comment.   3.3 magnitude earthquake 7 miles northeast of Union City (Calhoun County) or about 13 miles SSE of Battle Creek.  WOOD-TV did a live hit this evening from the actual cornfield that was at the center of the quake.  So this was significantly weaker than the earthquake in May.    Remember we had a magnitude 4.2 earthquake on 5/2 at 12:23 pm.  That was centered 5.5 miles south of Galesburg.  The earthquake today was centered 5 kilometers (think of a 5k race) underground.  An earthquake of this magnitude usually produces very little or no damage.

From the Detroit Free Press:  “The number of earthquakes has increased dramatically over the last few years in much of the U.S. From 1973 to 2008, there was an average of 21 earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 and larger in the central and eastern U.S., the USGS reported. This rate jumped to an average of 99 earthquakes of that intensity per year from 2009 to 2013, and the rate continues to rise. In 2014 alone, there were 659 magnitude-3.0 and larger earthquakes in the same geographical area, USGS reported.”  Check out their article here.

Earthquakes centered in Michigan are rare.  The biggest earthquake in “modern” times was a 4.6 magnitude quake that occurred on 8/9/1947 centered near Coldwater.   Two VERY strong earthquakes that shook most of the U.S. on 12/11/1811 and 2/8/1812 were felt strongly in Michigan.  Those quakes were centered along the Mississippi River in far SE Missouri and were strong enough to ring church bells in Boston.

At noon, it was only 63 deg. in G.R. – a chilly 46 deg. at Munising and 45 at Copper Harbor.  Here’s Michigan current conditions.

Also:  Typhoon Chan-horn forming in the Western Pacific…heading north of Guam.  Recurving typhoons often mean cooler than average temps. in the Great Lakes and East (though this particular typhoon may go into China – not sure if it will recurve yet).  Patchy fog over Lake Michigan…another day with limited solar warming of the lake water.  The south mid-Lake buoy is not reporting right now…the north mid-Lake Michigan buoy is 44.2 deg. and dropping since the wind has come up and the water is mixing.  The water temp. there at the buoy dropped 11.6 degrees between 8:50 am and 4:50 pm.  The smoke plume from Canadian wildfires is still well west of Michigan.   Santiago, Chile has only had 4 days w/ measurable rainfall totaling 6.2mm (0.24”) so far this year- normal is 167.4mm (6.59”).   A record 104 degrees F in Madrid, Spain yesterday.


Venus & Jupiter Closest Tonight

June 30th, 2015 at 2:15 am by under Bill's Blog, News, Weather

venus jupiter   Click on the image to enlarge.  Tonight (Tues. June 30) will be an awesome night to view the evening sky.  To the west, the planets Venus and Jupiter will be only 1/3rd of a degree apart – they’ll appear to be touching each other!  Check out this cool video from NASA about the coming together or “conjunction” of the two prominent planets.  Now look at this diagram to show you where Venus, Jupiter and Earth are relative to each other, the earth and the sun.    Venus appears brighter than Jupiter, because it’s significantly closer to us.   Tonight, Venus is about 48 million miles from the Earth.  Jupiter is 12 times farther away, at 565 million miles from the Earth. In reality, Jupiter is 11.8 times bigger than Venus.  Because the orbit of Venus is inside that of the Earth, we never see a “full” Venus (like we can see a full moon).  If you look at Venus through a telescope or a good set of binoculars. it will be a fat crescent.  This conjunction of Venus and Jupiter is more common than you might think.  Next year on August 27th, the two planets will be even closer – at 0.1 degree apart!   Fred Schaaf, contributing editor for Sky and Telescope pointed out that this current string of Venus-Jupiter conjunctions in the mid 2010s closely resembles a similar series of conjunctions that appeared in the western sky between the years 3 and 2 B.C. It has been suggested that their joint appearance came to be known as the Star of Bethlehem.  Quite a few historians place the time of the birth of Jesus as the spring of 4 BC (the 4-year error was due to not knowing at the time the calendar was formulated that Caesar Augustus (where the name of the month of August comes from) ruled for four years under the name Octavian.  Spring was when shepherds were most apt to be watching their flocks by night.  The two planets will slowly separate as we move through the month of July, but still remain relatively close through mid-month.

We also can turn to the ESE in the evening and see the brilliant full moon.  Technically, the moment of full moon is tomorrow night, July 1 at 10:20 pm EDT.  We have two full moons in the month of July.  The full moon of July 1 is the “Buck Moon“.  The second full moon of the month is called a “Blue Moon“.   The moon won’t appear bluish on 7/31 – it’ll look like any other full moon.  The term “blue moon” has been used for nearly 500 years.  This is also the full moon closest to the Summer Solstice (which occurred on June 21).  So, this full moon is the full moon that hangs lowest in the southern sky.   Off to the left an a little higher up in the sky, you can see the star Regulus.  For more on our evening sky, check out this week’s Sky at a Glance.  No ISS flyovers here in Michigan until 7/12.    (pic. is a screen grab from the NASA video by NBC12.com).


Watch Coming !!!

June 22nd, 2015 at 8:39 pm by under Bill's Blog, News, Weather

mcd1124   80% chance of a Tornado Watch soon!   SPC says:  “SUMMARY…TORNADO WATCH MAY BE REQUIRED BY 01Z FROM LOWER MI SWWD INTO NERN IL. DISCUSSION…LARGE SCALE ASCENT APPEARS TO BE INCREASING ACROSS LOWER MI PER EXPANDING ELEVATED CONVECTION THAT IS EVOLVING ATOP BOUNDARY LAYER STRATUS. WHILE 00Z SOUNDING AT DTX IS NOTABLY CAPPED…800MB TEMPERATURE IS 7C COOLER AT GRB IN CLOSER PROXIMITY TO SHORT-WAVE TROUGH. COOLING PROFILES ACROSS THIS REGION SHOULD CONTRIBUTE TO WEAKER INHIBITION OVER THE NEXT FEW HOURS AND ELEVATED CONVECTION IS EXPECTED TO STRENGTHEN AND NEAR-SFC BASED TSTMS WILL LIKELY EVOLVE WITH TIME…ESPECIALLY OVER SRN LOWER MI INTO NRN INDIANA. SHEAR PROFILES STRONGLY SUPPORT DEEP ROTATING UPDRAFTS AND GIVEN THE INSTABILITY OBSERVED SUPERCELLS SHOULD EVOLVE. ADDITIONALLY…DISCRETE SUPERCELL OVER NRN IL IS EXPECTED TO TRACK SEWD ALONG DECAYED OUTFLOW BOUNDARY TO THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE CHICAGO METRO AREA OVER THE NEXT FEW HOURS. THIS ACTIVITY COULD SPREAD INTO NWRN INDIANA LATER THIS EVENING.

from NWS :  – 900pm – We are on a conference call with @NWSSPC to coordinate a possible tornado watch in Southern Lower Michigan. #wmiwx #miwx

A heavy storm is over Gratiot Co.  Other showers and a couple of t-showers are southeast of a line from Muskegon to Mt. Pleasant.   No severe weather has been reported yet this evening.


Severe T-Storm Watch has been cancelled

June 22nd, 2015 at 1:36 pm by under Bill's Blog, News, Weather

WW0333 Radar      Confirmed tornado touchdown in Portland around 2:40 pm, on the ground for approx. 10 minutes, preliminary EF1. with 100 mph winds.  Damage in the millions.   NWS has a survey team on the scene. WOOD has had 4 crews in Portland.  We just showed some amazing drone video.   Severe damage to the Goodwill Building (3 were trapped inside…they were uninjured), the Rite Aid and the First Baptist Church.  No serious injuries there, we are told, just a few (5) minor injuries.  Many trees toppled and uprooted.  Damage west of Portland, one  structure fire, 8-10 fire depts. have responded to the Portland tornado path.  Gas leaks have been taken care of.  Canines checking for any further victims.  “Stay out of the area!!” – police.

We have a Tornado Watch for much of eastern Iowa and northern Illinonis.  We have a Severe T-Storm Watch for N. Wisconsin and the SW U.P.   We also have a Severe T-Storm Watch for N. Ohio.  There was a Tornado Warning over by Cedar Point.   Check out the updated Severe Weather Outlook Area and Probabilities here.   The Enhanced Risk Area has been shifted down into Illnois and Indiana.  We remain in a Slight Risk Area for this Evening.   There is a Beach Hazard – high risk of rip currents and structural currents this evening.

At 5:30 pm, 6,101 Consumers Energy customers without power, including 829 in Kent Co. (mostly small outages in 16 separate counties).   Trees and wires were down at 36th and Clay in Wyoming.  Minor building damage, trees down at 44th and Clay.  Looks like a wet microburst.  1.1″ rain in 40 minutes in Ada.

Kyle and I are tracking the showers and storms in Wisconsin.  If those develop into storms (big “if”), we could see a shower or storm at the lakeshore by 9:30 pm and into G.R. around 10-10:15 pm.   Breezy at times…Muskegon had a wind gust to 39 mph.


Severe T-Storm Watch for SE WI, N. IL, Lake Michigan

June 22nd, 2015 at 10:31 am by under Bill's Blog, News, Weather

http://www.spc.noaa.gov/products/watch/ww0332_radar_big.gifwatch coming Watch coming.  Severe t-storm watch for much of Lower Michigan thru early evening.  I’m starting a new thread.    1:25 pm – Northern Indiana NWS says “Very conditional severe at this time”.  Mostly just heavy rain so far.  Storms in IL weakened…still gusts to 30-40 mph in the Chicago area.  Heavy storms redeveloping in E. Iowa.    Heavy rain – cloud to ground lightning at my place…not severe…hail reported in Caledonia and gusts to 40 mph at Muskegon.  Power outage SE G.R. probably due to lightning.  Don’t have time to read thru all the blog comments.  To report severe weather to Storm Team 8, call 1-800-8WOOODTV, email newsroom@woodtv.com or go thru ReportIt at www.woodtv.com.  Main line in WI/IL has weakened a bit with time of day.  Gust to 45 mph just west of Milwaukee…down from +60 mph wihds that downed trees near Madison.   Storms in W. Michigan strengthening…formed along warm front Cass Co. to north of Milwaukee moving E/ENE into W. Michigan next 2 hours.   Severe T-Storm Watch until 4 pm EDT for SE WI, N IL, Lake Michigan…includes Chicago/Milwaukee…mainly for wind damage…areas south of I-96 down to northern Indiana pay special attention next few hours.   SPC says:  “SUMMARY…A SEVERE MCS WILL LIKELY CONTINUE EAST-SOUTHEASTWARD FROM SOUTHWEST WI AND NORTHEAST/EAST-CENTRAL IA INTO ADDITIONAL PORTIONS OF SOUTHERN WI/NORTHERN IL/NORTHWEST INDIANA…WITH A CORRIDOR/POSSIBLE SWATH OF DAMAGING WINDS REMAINING LIKELY. DISCUSSION…A HIGHLY ORGANIZED QUASI-LINEAR MCS WITH EARLY MORNING HISTORY OF SEVERE WIND GUSTS /AND EVEN WAKE LOW-RELATED GUSTS/ CONTINUES TO STEADILY SPREAD EAST-SOUTHEASTWARD ACROSS SOUTHWEST WI AND NORTHEAST/EAST-CENTRAL IA AS OF 14Z. WHILE CLOUD COVER PRECEDES THE MCS ACROSS NORTHERN IL/SOUTHERN WI…MODEST WARMING/MOISTENING CONTINUES TO OCCUR IN TANDEM WITH A WARM FRONT THAT EXTENDS EAST-SOUTHEASTWARD AHEAD OF THE MCS. THIS ENVIRONMENTAL SCENARIO…ALONG WITH THE HIGHLY ORGANIZED/FAST-MOVING NATURE OF THE MCS…SUGGESTS THAT THE POTENTIAL FOR POTENTIALLY WIDESPREAD DAMAGING WINDS WILL CONTINUE TO QUICKLY SPREAD EAST-SOUTHEASTWARD ACROSS MUCH OF NORTHERN IL/SOUTHERN WI/NORTHWEST INDIANA.”       Lightning strikes last 6 hours.   Windy conditions from “wake low” possible this PM in W. Michigan.   Dangerous rip currents and structural currents possible on Lake Michigan this PM…best to stay out of water more than waist deep.

Here’s where you’ll be able to see storm reports from SW WI, NE IL, SE WI, NW IL.  Menominee, Illinois reports:  “MENOMINEE FIRE HOUSE BLOWN OVER BY STRONG WINDS.”  Measured 72 mph wind gust at the Dubuque IA airport.  Roof blown off school near Dubuque…semi blown over.   DELAWARE COUNTY EM REPORTED EXTENSIVE DAMAGE 1 TO 2 MILES NORTH OF MANCHESTER, Iowa. DAMAGE INCLUDED AGRICULTURE BUILDINGS FLATTENED AND TREES SNAPPED OFF.  80 mph reported 6 miles west of Dubuque.  78 mph gust measured in Dyersburg IA.  At Independence IA:  “STRONGER THAN 80 MPH…BRANCHES DOWN AND PIECES OF NEIGHBORS HOUSES AND ROOFING LYING IN OUR FRONT YARD. TORRENTIAL RAIN..HIGH SCHOOL ON WEST SIDE OF INDEPENDENCE MEASURED SUSTAINED WIND SPEEDS OF 93.9 MPH.    WATCH HRRR MODEL – WIND DAMAGE THREAT VERY REAL!!

At 11 am – dew point to 69 in G.R. and 74 southern suburbs of Chicago…80 deg. at the Holland MI airport, 53 at the mid-lake buoy – upper 70s in Chicago where clouds are thickening.  If you know someone in N. IL – Rockford, Chicago, might be an idea to let them know this is coming.  You might want to forward a link to the blog.  Other storms gathering ahead of main line near Milwaukee and in the western half of Lake Michigan.  Stay safe and keep checking the blog and the www.woodtv.com weather page.

I’m heading to the shower and then into work…the astute blog commenters will keep things fresh.


Severe Risk for Monday AM – 10 am update – HATCHED AREA!

June 22nd, 2015 at 2:46 am by under Bill's Blog, News, Weather

severe outlook 1    severe outlook 2severe outlook 3severe outlook 4 10 am – HATCHED AREA!  These are the severe weather outlook probabilities from the Storm Prediction Center for this Monday PM.  These are the forecast maps from the 8 am update…so…they will not update automatically when the outlook may be updated later this morning …however you can click on these images to enlarge or on the link here to make sure you have the latest outlook maps:    The General Outlook has an Enhanced Area that covers much of Wisconsin, Lower Michigan, far SE Minnesota, E. Iowa, N. Illinois, far northern Indiana and a small part of NW Ohio.  Surrounding the Enhanced Outlook is a large Slight Risk Area that covers everyone from Rochester NY to Kansas City to Duluth to S. Ste. Marie, including N. Lower Michigan and the U.P.  Surrounding the Slight Risk is a Marginal Risk.  The most favorable time for severe storms in West Michigan is late afternoon/evening, roughly 2 pm to 1 am, though I can’t rule out something earlier or later.  Two threads down is radar and lots of links.  A line of strong to severe storms has been pushing from MN and maybe N Iowa into Wisconsin and far NW Illinois…that line has produced 70 mph winds.  The first question is how long that t-storm complex can maintain itself as it chugs thru Wisconsin toward/over Lake Michigan.  Then we have to worry about storms that develop this afternoon along an approaching cold front in WI/IL and push east.  Look at the storms headed our wayDamage in S. MN.  “The Hammer” is coming!  Side note:  Looks like a relatively cool first half of July.

We now have hatched areas!  The 2nd map is the probability of a tornado.  The hatched area is a 10% chance of an EF2 to EF5 tornado within 25 miles of a given point.  So the odds of a tornado according to SPC are twice as high in WI and far N. Illinois than in Michigan (5% – with no hatch).  The third map is the important one.  It now has a hatched are from far N. Indiana (along I-80) up to roughly Whitehall to Saginaw.  In this area, they have a +30% chance of a gust to 75+ mph within 25 miles of a given point (more on that here).  The last map is for hail…with a hatched area over S. Wisconsin and far N. Illinois.  The hatched area is a +10% chance of a report of 2″ diameter or greater hail within 25 miles of a given point.

The second map is the probability of a tornado occurring within 25 miles of a specific point.  The 10% chance is over S. Wisconsin and far N. Illinois.  We have a lesser, but still noteworthy 5% chance in Lower Michigan.  The third map from the left is the probability of a severe wind report within 25 miles of a specific point.  This is a hefty 30% over the Enhanced Area, including much of Wisconsin and Lower Michigan.  Finally, the fourth map is the probability of severe hail (1″ in diameter or greater), which is highest in Wisconsin, N. Illnois and E. Iowa.  This is typical, with the initial supercell storms more likely to produce hail or a tornado…then the storms gel into a bowing line and the most common and widespread threat is damaging winds.   Note that the probably of a severe wind gust report within 25 miles of a specific point is 30%, while the probably of a tornado is 5%.  So the probability of wind damage is 6 times greater than a tornado.   Also, keep in mind that a tornado might affect a relatively small area compared to a widespread wind event like a derecho (and I’m not implying that we’ll get a derecho here).  In a situation like this, if a tree gets blown down in your front yard…it’s probably more than 100 times more likely to be blown down by severe t-storm wind than by a tornado.  While it’s very important to have a safety plan for tornadoes and to take any tornado warning seriously…it’s also important to get in a safe place when there is a threat of severe winds.

Here’s the full SPC Severe Weather Discussion.   They say in part:  “…STORM REDEVELOPMENT /SCATTERED COVERAGE/ WILL OCCUR LATER IN THE AFTERNOON NEAR THE RESIDUAL BOUNDARY OVER THE WRN GREAT LAKES OR ALONG THE FRONT LOCATED OVER CNTRL WI SW INTO ERN IA. THE STRENGTH OF THE DEEP LAYER SHEAR VECTOR /50-70 KT/ AND ITS ORIENTATION TO THE BOUNDARY COUPLED WITH A VERY STRONG TO EXTREMELY BUOYANT /3000-4500 J PER KG MLCAPE/ BOUNDARY LAYER WOULD PROMOTE EXPLOSIVE UPDRAFT DEVELOPMENT AND A SUPERCELLULAR MODE EARLY IN THE STORM LIFECYCLE. ALL SEVERE HAZARDS WOULD BE POSSIBLE WITH THIS ACTIVITY…INCLUDING SIGNIFICANT HAIL/WIND/TORNADO. FURTHER STORM DEVELOPMENT ALONG THE FRONT WILL FAVOR A TRANSITION TO A MIXED MODE AND PROBABLY YIELD A WIND/HAIL THREAT BECOMING PREDOMINATE WITH TIME. STORMS SHOULD MOVE DOWNSTREAM AND INTO THE SRN AND LOWER GREAT LAKES STATES OVERNIGHT WITH THE PRIMARY RISK BEING ISOLD LARGE HAIL/WIND.”  Here’s current SPC severe weather watches, meso-discussions and storm reports. 

Detroit NWS 2:35 am discussion at this link says this in part:  “A LEGITIMATE TORNADIC THREAT WOULD ALSO EXIST DURING THE SUPERCELL PHASE AS LCLS LOWER WITH THE HELP OF ADVECTION OF RICH LOW-LEVEL MOISTURE AND DECREASED MIXING DURING THE NOCTURNAL PERIOD. INCREDIBLY HIGH VGP AROUND 1 IS A TESTAMENT TO THE MAGNITUDE OF SHEAR AVAILABLE FOR TILTING WHILE SUFFICIENT CAPE IN THE LOWEST LEVELS LOOKS TO BE AVAILABLE TO ENHANCE STRETCHING PROCESSES. A FEW TORNADOS CANNOT BE RULED OUT MAINLY NORTH OF M59. MAGNITUDE OF ENVIRONMENTAL WIND FIELD ALONE WILL ALSO SUPPORT STRAIGHT LINE WIND GUST POTENTIAL TO 70 MPH.”  Here’s the forecast discussion for N Indiana and the Michigan Counties that border Indiana and the latest NWS forecast discussion for SW Michigan, N. Lower Michigan, NE Illinois and S. Wisconsin.

What can you do now?  Run errands in the AM if you can so you can minimize driving when storms arrive later in the day.  Check your yard…take down hanging baskets, pick up toys, make sure the garbage bin won’t take off down the street.  You might turn your trampoline upside down…it’ll be less apt to fly into the neighbor’s yard.  Don’t park your car under trees if possible.  Keep the garage door closed, especially if it faces west.  After the storm stay away from any downed power lines and perhaps check on your neighbors.  Storm Team 8 will be tracking the storms on the air and online.  Extra staff has been called in and we have specific assignments in a situation like this.  TV comes first, so I may not be updating the blog all the time, but there are some very smart people who will keep the blog fresh with their comments.  Stay safe and thanks for checking my blog.


Rare Rain in the Desert

June 9th, 2015 at 9:16 pm by under Bill's Blog, News, Weather

Yuma average rainfall A remarkable thing happened in Yuma, Arizona today. It rained! This is the first time Yuma has ever had measurable rain on any June 9th…and records go back to 1876! Before today, Yuma had only had one day with measurable rain since 1988.

So far today, Yuma has had 0.31″ (and it’s still raining). That makes today the 2nd wettest day ever in the month of June and the wettest June since 1912. Yuma averages 3.30″ of rain per year. June is the driest month of the year with an average rainfall of 0.01″.  The rain was from the remnants of Hurricane Blanca.  At mid-afternoon it was warmer in G.R. than in Yuma.


Derecho of 1998 – 17 years ago today

May 31st, 2015 at 2:19 pm by under Bill's Blog, News, Weather

File:May 1998 Derecho Radar Loop.gif May 31st is the anniversary of the famous “derecho” thunderstorm outbreak of 1998.  Hard to believe it’s been 17 years ago already.   Around 5 AM that Sunday morning, the storms blasted through West Michigan with winds estimated as high as 130 mph in Grand Haven and Walker. According to the Storm Prediction Center, this episode ranks as one of the top thunderstorm events in world history! A large area of significant wind damage occurred from South Dakota all the way to the East Coast. In Michigan, there were four fatalities and 153 people were injured. Not a single stoplight was working between Grand Rapids and Baldwin. The toll would have been much worse if the storms would have come through in the afternoon instead of in the early morning when most people were asleep in their homes. I went out to visit Spencer, S.D. where the worst tornado occurred as the supercells first formed. That small town was pretty much wiped out. The supercells eventually formed the line that raced from eastern S.D. to Massachusetts and out into the Atlantic Ocean. Sixteen years later you can still identify swaths where most of the trees were blown over (White Lake exit on US 31 – the Spring Lake Cemetery). Here’s a radar loop from S. Dakota to Michigan. Read more here, here, and here. More pics. here. The 1998 storm was a “once in a lifetime event”. I would be surprised if we saw an event of that intensity (130 mph wind gusts in Grand Haven and Walker) and widespread area again in my lifetime. Here’s pictures from Grand Haven after the storm.   I remember writing a paper about this storm for the power companies of the U.S. with the help of Robert Johns who was forecasting that night at the Storm Prediction Center.

Also, check out these old pictures of downtown G.R.

 


Great Lakes Water Levels, Ice and News

May 29th, 2015 at 12:12 am by under Bill's Blog, News, Weather

Traverse City - Mission Peninsula by Michelle 5 24 15 with Alex and Maya  This pic. was taken last Sunday PM by Michelle Olin.  I’m on the Mission Peninsula just north of Traverse City with the famous child author Alex and dancer extraordinare, Maya.  You can see the West Bay in the background.  The pic. on the left is Traverse Bay (from Michelle Olin).

Lake Superior, has a 0.0% ice cover, but you can still see a little bit of blue in Agawa Bay, indicating a 0.5% ice cover in the bay…so there are still a few ice cubes floating around there on May 29!  If you look at this MODIS satellite picture from Thursday afternoon (from NOAA Coastwatch), you can still see a very small bit of ice next to the shore there in Agawa Bay.  This satellite pic. from later in the afternoon shows a lot of fog over Lake Superior.   The MODIS pic. of Lake Michigan shows an area of fog between N. Manitou Is. and the east edge of Green Bay.  You can see where the easterly lake breeze has pushed into E. Wisconsin and there are no cumulus clouds along the shore.  Here in Michigan the west-southwest lake breeze front combined with the increase in elevation touched off a few scattered showers in the mid-late afternoon from N. Montcalm Co. up toward Cadillac.  There’s also some streaks of cirrus passing through.  The Lake Huron pic. shows the cumulus clouds over the warmer land and clear skies over the cooler water.   Here’s a cool satellite pic. showing cloud swirls (vortecies) over the Canary Islands.   Check out this pic. showing snow left in the mountains of British Columbia and check out all the snow that’s left after a cool spring in Iceland.

Lake Michigan/Huron is up 2″ in the last month, up 11″ in the past year and the lake is 6″ above the century average for May. Lake Superior is up 4″ in the last month, up 2″ in the last year and Superior is 9″ above the May average. Lake Erie is up 1″ in the last month, down 4″ in the last year and is at the same level as May 2014. Lake Ontario is up 3″ in the last month, down 14″ in the last year and is now 7″ below the century May average. Lake St. Clair is at the same level as it was one month ago and one year ago and is now 4″ above average.  Water flow down the St. Mary’s river from Lake Superior into Lake Huron, the flow down the St. Clair and Detroit Rivers from Lake Huron to Lake Erie and the flow down the Niagara River from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario are all expected to be above average into June.  The flow out of Lake Ontario into the St. Lawrence River is expected to be a little below average.

Also:  Great Lakes fish farmingGreat Lakes fish surveys underwayfamous floating restaurant to be scrappedrude protestors, all 3 of them20-foot long killer fish used to live in what is now N. OhioNew icebreaker coming to the Great LakesI saw one in Benzie Co. a few years ago3.6 million have already seen this…not Great Lakes, but a pretty twilight in Jamaica.   How aircraft deal with scattered thunderstorms in Atlanta.  That’s why some pilots make good NASCAR drivers.   Dallas/Fort Worth Airport breaks record for wettest May with 13.67” of rain.

 


Severe T-Storm Watch is Over for Most of Michigan

May 26th, 2015 at 2:35 pm by under Bill's Blog, News, Weather

WW0220 Initial Radar image WW0221 RADAR Thumbnail ImageFunnel Montcalm Co. 5 26 15   The Severe T-Storm Watch has been cancelled for everyone except far NE Lower Michigan (north of Saginaw Bay)

Severe reports:  Possible funnel cloud in Montcalm CoAnother picAnother pic.   Here’s video clearly showing a rotating wall cloudPossible wall cloud in Isabella Co.  Gust to 60 mph at Quincy in Branch Co.  Reports of trees down at Elm and Quarterline in Newaygo.  Small hail reported near Battle Creek.  (Unhealthy-looking) tree down on car in Lansing.    Rainfall from 2 pm – 8 pm:  0.85″ Kalamazoo, 0.68″ Muskegon, 0.65″ Holland – Boatwerks, 0.61″ Holland Airport, 0.61″ Rockford, 0.53″ Hudsonville, 0.44″ Hudsonville, 0.38″ Eberhard Center – downtown G.R., 0.38″ here at WOOD, 0.34″ Lansing, 0.34″ Big Rapids, 0.24″ Grand Rapids.

There are two Severe T-Storm Watches. We have one that covers most all of Lower Michigan (not Berrien or Cass Counties and another Severe T-Storm Watch until for Branch, St. Joseph and Hillsdale Counties in Michigan, for much of Eastern Indiana and for Western Ohio. The main threat is isolated damaging wind.   A FEW SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS WITH HAIL SURFACE AND ALOFT TO 1-INCH (not a high risk of hail). EXTREME TURBULENCE AND SURFACE WIND GUSTS TO as high as 70 mph. Individual storm movement southwest to northeast at 35 mph with the line(s) progressing from west to east across the area.  Chance of rain – very high.  Chance of severe (60 mph winds or 1″ hail) in any one spot – low.  We’ve heated up near 80 deg. (pretty good instability).  Dewpoints up into the low-mid 60s – so we have available moisture.  Surface map shows marginal convergence.   Not a lot of lightning so far, many areas just getting rain showers.   Over 70 severe reports in the U.S. today.

Looks like a cool weekend…could be breezy, chilly and wet Sat. AM – No frost, wind should hold up Sun./Mon. mornings…but low 40s possible.

Links:  Check out the GRR NWS discussion and the latest surface map. Check out Regional radar. Here’s GRR radar, local lightning data, SPC meso-discussions and current watches and a satellite loop. Here’s current Michigan temperatures, National lightning data and the latest discussion from Milwaukee NWS. Here’s National Storm Reports.